Children Can Participate in Eczema Trials

Hear from the Experts
A parent and child looking at a clinical trial booklet together.

As a parent, it’s often hard to tell if what is on your child’s skin is a rash or something different, like atopic dermatitis. Understanding what to look for and what your child is experiencing can help both of you feel more comfortable.

The first signs of atopic dermatitis, also known as eczema, are a rash or dry scaly skin, often limited to one part of the body. Usually on children, it appears on the cheeks, thighs, or arms. Eczema is the result of inflammation in the skin cells, causing the skin to break open or react in abnormal ways. As a parent, it can be frightening to see, and it can be very uncomfortable and itchy for little ones.

Eczema is much more disruptive than a regular rash, and when left untreated, it can last a very long time. Eczema can be so itchy it keeps kids awake at night, making them tired and distracted the following day. This can make it harder for them to cope with their day. They may find it difficult to focus on school or it can make little ones extra irritable. The affected skin can look scary too and can be embarrassing for kids. It can cause them to hide their skin or avoid certain social situations. The itching and rubbing of the skin can also lead to infections, bleeding, and open sores. These sores can then make children want to avoid bathtime and swimming or even certain clothes.

Being a parent means all you want is to help your child feel better. Clinical trials are how we find new options for treating a disease. We wouldn’t have the medicines we have available today if we didn’t have research.

A child in a pink hoodie sitting at a table with plastic bricks on it. The child is smiling.

Pediatric Research

At Lilly, we want to continue developing and making medicines for children and young people living with atopic dermatitis (eczema) and other medical conditions. Learn more about pediatric research.

At Lilly, we want to continue developing and making medicines for children and young people living with atopic dermatitis (eczema) and other medical conditions. Learn more about pediatric research.

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